A Breakfast & Warm up exercise

Breakfast means "break the fast". Breakfast is the first meal after the long night sleep, where your body detoxes and repair itself. It can be compared with a warming up exercise done by an athlete before going for a run or players prepare them before a match.

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Let us compare breakfast with warm up exercise.

A breakfast is the first meal after a long night's sleep, where, your body detoxes and repairs itself. It can be compared with a warming up exercise done by an athlete before going for a run or, players preparing themselves before a match,which will make them ready for a stable performance.

What happens during warm up? Muscles and tissues stretch and relax, so that it can be more flexible in play. Similarly, anything we eat in the morning should help the natural process of detox and repair/regain to a ready state for upcoming foods of the day.

Can we skip warm up?, Will it affect our performance? Yes, Absolutely. Tight muscles and tissues are not relaxed, so it may slow down our response during play. Sometimes you can even sprain a muscle. Skipping breakfast will make you feel hungry, tired and lethargic. This is because the energy required is not provided, so the body start taking the necessary glucose from the tissues. On the other side, your stomach will start producing real acid to enable digestion. Empty stomach with acid leads to heartburn, which is not a healthy sign. It may lead to an ulcer and build up of gas.

Does that mean a heavy warm up exercise will be beneficial? Absolutely NOT. Too much of warming up will make us feel exhausted and tired. Warm up exercise should be mild and fresh. Likewise, a heavy breakfast is not advisable in the morning. Foods which contain complex carbohydrates, rich in fibre will be best kind of breakfast.

Digestive action starts mildy in the morning and goes to peak in the noon and slows down by evening.

A breakfast with a variety of choices as mentioned below, is considered healthy:

  1. Fresh fruits like bananas, avoid sour fruits.
  2. Boiled potatoes and vegetables.
  3. Whole grain bread, oatmeal or a porridge.
  4. Nuts.
  5. Fresh juice (not from a can or tetra pack.)

Do not confuse yourself between a full meal and heavy meal. A full meal is just loading your stomach full with eating more of prescribed foods, but a heavy meal contains fat rich foods like fries, cheese and paneer, which may be little difficult to get digested.

In simple, a breakfast is, Eat easy to digest food and don't over eat.

Know about : Chickpeas

Chickpea is a legume, also known as Bengal gram or channa. They are divided in two types Desi and Kabuli.

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Chickpea is a legume, also known as Bengal gram or channa. They are divided in two types Desi and Kabuli. The classification is based on seed size, color, and the thickness and shape of the seed coat. Desi types tend to be smaller, angular seeds with thick seed coats that range in color from light tan and speckled to solid black.

 

Chickpeas (Desi)

'Desi' chickpeas have a markedly higher fibre content than other varieties, hence a very low glycemic index, which may make them suitable for people with blood sugar problems. 


The 'Desi' type is used to make chana dal, which is a split chickpea with the skin removed.

Source from Wikipedia

'Kabuli' is lighter-coloured, larger, and with a smoother coat. The name means "from Kabul" in Hindi and Urdu, and this variety was thought to come from Kabul, Afghanistan when it was introduced to India in the 18th century. It is called Kabuli chana (काबुली चणा) in Marathi.


Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East. Chickpeas are a nutrient-dense food, providing rich content (> 20% of the Daily Value, DV) of protein, dietary fibre, folate, and certain dietary minerals such as iron and phosphorus. Thiamin, vitamin B6, magnesium, and zinc contents are moderate, providing 10-16% of the DV. Chickpeas have a protein digestibility corrected amino acid score of about 0.76, which is higher than many other legumes and cereals.

 

According to WHO and UNFAO, proteins in cooked and germinated chickpeas are rich in essential amino acids. A 100-g serving of cooked chickpeas provides 164 kilocalories (690 kJ). Carbohydrates make up 68% of calories, most of which (84%) is starch, followed by total sugars and dietary fibre.Lipid content is 3%, 75% of which is unsaturated fatty acids for which linoleic acid comprises 43% of total fat.

 

India is the world leader in chickpea (Bengal gram) production, and produces some 15 times as much as the second-largest producer, Australia. Between 80 and 90 percent of the world’s chickpea supply is from India.

Grains, Millets & Legumes in our Daily Life

Cereals and Pulses occupy a major portion of the food pyramid. They provide the body with a powerful mixture of protective substances including fibre, antioxidant, vitamins and minerals and phytonutrients, and help ward off many diseases.

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Cereals and Pulses occupy a major portion of the food pyramid. They provide the body with a powerful mixture of protective substances including fibre, antioxidant, vitamins and minerals and phytonutrients, and help ward off many diseases.

Typical whole grain food is

  • Low in saturated fat but is a source of polyunsaturated fats that has essential fats.
  • Cholesterol-free
  • High in both soluble and insoluble fibre and resistant starch
  • An excellent source of carbohydrates
  • A significant source of protein
  • A good Source of B group vitamins, including folate
  • A good source of many minerals, such as iron, magnesium, copper, phosphorus and zinc
  • A good source of antioxidants and phytochemicals.
  • It can help lower blood cholesterol levels.

 

Now a days consumptions of grains has greatly reduced. Our elders used to consume various grains in their daily life that helped them stay healthy.